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20130117
20130125
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. chris cillizza, the foreign policy, in many regards, has been run out of the white house, and perhaps even more so because mcdonagh, the deputy of national security director is going to be the next chief of staff. >> right. no reason to think that will change. andrea, look, we don't focus enough on foreign policy, but the challenges, we focus on the domestic challenges for barack obama, and as we talked about, his inaugural speech was very domestically focused. look, we just had elections in israel, john kerry not in the same place benjamin netanyahu is regarding a two-state solution, at least right now. there are huge challenges, iran, there are huge challenges in the foreign policy front that don't get talked about as much, but are clearly things that not only will be difficult for the president and his team to navigate, but will also have a significant say in how this president is viewed by history. >> and, by the way, we just got word that the white house is going to proceed with a nomination of general allen to be the nato supreme allied commander now that he's been cleared by th
surprising and perhaps not surprising many the speech in the last block, but i thought this foreign policy piece was one of the more surprising things he mentioned. insofar as it sounded like obama 1.0, the obama that was elected in 2008, who has since expanded the use of drones and extra judicial killings, who has had a very aggressive national security policy in place. i wondered what that meant, especially against the back drop of what is happening in the middle east, in syria, and algeria, and mali. what was your read on it? >> but has also, to be fair to president obama, ended the iraq war and begun the drive out of the afghanistan war. one of the really interesting things about the second term, we talked in the first segment about all of the issues of medicare and social security. anything there has to go through a republican house. >> right. >> creating obama's foreign policy does not, for the most part, and we can argue about congressional authority, but presidents have wide latitude on foreign policy, and his appointments on the foreign policy side in chuck hagel and to some lesse
of transition for american foreign policy as senator john kerry faces a high-stakes job interview to be the secretary of state. kerry's confirmation hearings were rather cordial hosted by the foreign relations committee which he's led for the past four years. but it was an unexpected moment when the hearings were interrupted by a protester that offered perhaps the most telling revelation about the man and the moment. >> i'm tired of my friends dying. i don't know if they're going to be alive the next day. >> when i first came to washington and testified, i obviously was testifying as part of a group of people who came here to have their voices heard, and that is, above all, what this place is about. people measure what we do. >> kerry's confirmation hearing today comes a day after secretary hillary clinton stood her ground offering a robust defense of her handling of those attacks in benghazi that killed four americans, including ambassador chris stevens. at wednesday's long-awaited hearings on benghazi, clinton took responsibility for security lapses but that obviously was not go
of cool detachment has been his foreign policy hallmark. "economist writes, that a tone of cool detachment has been his foreign policy hallmark. from being the "indispensable nation, "so how do you see the nex they are a catalyst present but t four years? not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that factor into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds great, but i think it will be very difficult to do, especially if that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if you look -- broade
foreign policy posts, we can be sure that vietnam will continue to lurk in the foreign policy apparatus. you'd think we couldn't learn more of what happened in vietnam given the books and movies telling the tales but you would be wrong. one day, one graduate student researching post traumatic stress disorder searched through secret pentagon archives and interviewing vets and reading journals to uncover the story of american atrocities in vietnam. in a war where we killed more than 2 million civilians. the result is a book called "kill anything that moves" where he says the stunning scale of civilian suffering far beyond the result of bad apples but the policy. serious accusations of nick turs joining us now. i want to warn the viewers some of the images in this segment might be disturbing. but nick, the most important question, what is the value to america in unearthing this now and talking to americans about the things, the atrocities that happened in vietnam at american hands? >> well, thanks for having me on. i think it's incumbent on americans to know exactly what war is about, espe
of experiences. both in foreign policy and on the crime bill, the '94 crime bill is something he shepherded and his extraordinary ability to deal with senate republicans in a way a lot of people can't. senator reed and mitch mcconnell don't get along that well so i don't read nieg into it other than the president has an eset in the vice president and he's using that asset and he's deploying him well. the thing we should be mindful of is that there's over the next four years there's going to be a lot of tea leaf reading but at the end of the day, you know, the president is using the personing that get a job done and he's done an extraordinary job so far. let me say, passing this legislation will be tough. it's important to put your best feet on the ground there because it's really not -- it's going to be tough to get these bills passed. >> and it's not just ability. the vice president -- and again i worked closely with him for a few years -- he really likes this kind of political dealmaking in a way i don't think the president likes that much. if he's pushed to it he can do it. but the vice
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
and the opportunity i see for us. if this were a foreign policy speech, i think we'd call it the obama doctrine. it was the firmest commitment we've seen to a progressive agenda and that's why the liberal community is singing hosanas and there are views coming in from the liberals that were holding back and saying, he almost declared war. this was not about unity. this is what i want to pursue. >> but jessica, if this is about who he is, i assume -- does he, i guess let me pose it as a question. is it more important to be successful or lay out those principles where they are talking about gun control, immigration perhaps would have common ground, gay rights. he's picking some fights with the conservative republicans who still control the house. >> he -- obviously he wants to succeed. i think this was an action speech and what he was doing was going -- building on what david was saying, he was calling on his supporters to what we've heard lobby congress from the outside and picking up on what we were talking about earlier with this message about equality and the gay rights movement, that is his
it a foreign policy of hope and change. a change, and you let it happen and you hope it works out. you hope the secularists, when in actuality we know who's filled that vacuum it's been al-qaeda, and from libya and syria trying to take down the regime in egypt. in algeria, mali, across the board they're on the roll and this administration refuses to acknowledge it it. >> brian: what's interesting, whether you agree with president bush or not, he had a freedom agenda, would put advisors on the ground or domestic forces and go in there in quick strike operations. what is this president's mission, is it all about drones with hell-fire missiles? >> it seems like, afghanistan we're headed for the exits even sooner than he talked about on the campaign trail. he's got the quote, flexibility for the second term. i think he believes that with drone strikes and special operators he can affect things enough and anybody who's been on the ground knows it's intelligence on the ground, relationships, even if it's not a massive war front bilike iraq or afghanistan, it's events on the ground that affect not
's foreign policy. the foreign policy is what difference does it make? hey, what difference does it make if we give our sworn enemies, people who want to wipe israel and us off the map, so we give them the method to wipe them out? what's the big deal? >> brian: what do you say to people who say hue bark wasn't a benevolent dictator even though he was good to us. should we have not been giving egypt aid all those years? >> we were not interfering with the internal situation in these countries, but mubarak had agreements with this country. this administration throws our allies under the bus. they've done it with the northern alliance that fought the taliban in afghanistan. they did it with poland. we'd deal with them for defensive weapons. they've done it repeatedly and as a west african told me when i was over there a couple of years ago, he said, we were so excited when you elected a black president. but please, tell people in washington stop getting weaker. the world sees you getting weaker! don't do that. you put us in jeopardy. we're putting ourselves in jeopardy when we're sending je
foreign policy of the united states. the united states engages in so many activities without thinking through the consequences, and the nato attack on libya, the hijacking of the libyan uprising has led to the flooding of northwest africa with weapons that is now out of control. the uprising, and the subsequent uprising in mali which has now been taken over by the al qaeda in the iz lslamic maghreb and further activities of the kidnappings are all of the direct consequences of an action that in my opinion, the united states should never have en gamged in. >> i would say as we watch that we will cover this in the future as we watch the french intervention in mali, the u.s. is not alone in engaging in ad hoc french policy, and some of the french citizens are asking themselves questions about that, donna. >> well, switching subjects, i think that we now know that the president is willing to go big, and we saw it in the statement that he made about what is going to be done on guns. both the 23 executive orders that he signed, but as well as saying to the congress, we have to have an assau
to the middle east and try to become a big foreign policy president. he's getting us out of wars in iraq and afghanistan and eisenhower got us out of korea. i think ike's in the air these days. it's a -- eisenhower revision going on. >> douglas brinkley, thanks so much for coming in. >> the connections to the past and past presidents is always so fun it look at and so amazing how there are so many similarities. when we get back, we'll have the latest news of the day, of course, plus a behind the scenes look what's happening at the white house this inauguration weekend. >> first we want to give you this week's look at the human factor. >> miss montana surrounded by more than 50 other beauty queens on stage. all hoping to become miss america. but for most of her early life, alexis weinman spent her time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i really didn't have any friends. >> her parents knew there was something wrong but their small town of cutbank, montana didn't have the resources to help them figure out what it was. at t
. and three, coming back to the president's speech, it indicates that foreign policy is not going to go away as an issue for the white house. and one interesting factoid is when they went into iraq, they made senior officials sit down and watch the battle of algiers back in 1957 because that was the prototype of how to get it wrong in terms of trying to suppress extremists in armed conflict. and essentially the echoes of that original algerian war are still reverberating even today. and not even the white house can escape them. >> what's that movie called? >> al qaeda is today a franchise operation. >>> up next, whole foods' ceo john mackey is here with his new book that puts a new spin on capitalism. we're going to be back in a minute. (announcer) make mornings special, with fancy feast mornings gourmet cat food. mornings are delicious protein rich entrees with garden veggies and egg. fancy feast mornings. the best ingredient is love. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by
off a foreign policy team to shape that as well that looks different. >> it does look different than the first term. it is about returning america home and defining what engagement looks like in a second term. he just got tax increases and he wants more revenue. if he can find a way to say i will cut sending in a big way and has the ability of splitting that republican coalition and he seems to be interested in doing. >> he was very close in the senate to the senator from oklahoma. if you spend 15 minutes with him as i did recently, he has ways to reduce spending on medicare that also improves service. the system is a mess. i think if i'm barack obama which obviously i'm not, but pafr ever we are in a bar and he's about to get inaugurated. >> would invite him to dinner about how to make medicare better and cheaper. >> here told us and tells a lot of people that's not who i am. i get a feeling the president is ready to get out of his comfort zone and reach out to democrats and republicans. >> there is this idea that the second term we have about a year and a half o
relatively benign. interest rate policy benign. as long as foreign exchange volatility remains rather muted, becky, risk asset, both housing and equity should continue to do well. we expect s&ps probably to get above 1500 by the end of march, beginning part of april. >> i'm sure people everywhere are going to be irritated with you this morning, john. let's talk about some of the things that we heard from these companies who have reported today. we spoke with ellen kullman the ceo of dupont a little earlier. we talked about how things like construction are expected to be very strong in the first half of the year. but things like automobiles, maybe not as strong as they were at the end of 2012. is that things that the stock market knows at this point or is this things that could actually move some of those other indices? she also talked about something something being very strong and maybe that helps somebody like a john deere. >> those are two different stories. fnks financing rates and borrowing rates remind very, very kind and a turnover within the domestic stock of automobiles should cont
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)